Oct 272023
 

As the Registrar of my local Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Chapter, I recently submitted an application on behalf of a candidate that ended up in the “pended application” file.

The application was for Patriot William Craft, and I had a few concerns when I started working the application. The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) had three applications for the Patriot, but flagged the record as “Future Applicants must complete”. The DAR record did not list his date/location of birth, death, or provide any references for his revolutionary war service. Since the SAR will not approve any application for patriots flagged by DAR with addressing concerns, I contacted the DAR as to what additional information was needed. Their response was “Everything, the vital information and the specific service. The last application was done in the year, 1893.”,

The applicant had already gathered additional proof to address the shortcomings notated in the DAR file. We had a burial records showing when and where the patriot died. We also found sources documenting his specific service during the Revolutionary War. I was confident that we had the necessary proofs to meet the current DAR requirements for the service and/or the lineage.

I did find a discrepancy with the DAR files from 1893. The DAR database listed the patriots spouse as Hannah Sutton. However, we found that the Patriot William Craft was married to Hannah Haight., and Sutton was her mother’s maiden name. I addressed this by writing a proof statement that William Craft was married to Hannah Haight.

My second concern with the application proving the bloodline. The application bloodline was through William Craft’s son Sutton Craft. William Craft had left a will, but it did not mention Sutton Craft. The DAR application address this by including a letter written by family member that transcribed family records showing that Sutton Craft was indeed the son of William and Hannah Craft I consulted with our state registrar if he thought the SAR record would accept the letter written in 1890 as proof because the letter was written at a period in their lifetime.

The staff genealogist did not agree. He completely dismissed the letter from the DAR file, and “Pended” the application until further proofs could be provided. His response in part is as follows:

This application used a document from DAR# 3068. his document is hand written and copied at least twice.  There are no sources listed.  At best this document is 2nd or 3rd hand information and may even be “Family Folklore”.  DAR# 3068 is from an application submitted to DAR at the end of the 19th century or early 20th century, about a hundred years ago.  It cannot be be used as a source document.

There is currently no proof that Sutton Craft is the son of William Craft or that the surname of William Craft’s wife is Haight or her father is Charles Haight.  We need to prove these relationships before the review can continue.

This was not the first time one of my candidate’s applications ended up in the “Pended Applications” file [1]read my post about the strict policy on birth certificates: https://www.americankindred.com/wp/archives/529. However this case was different. It was all about connecting the applicant’s bloodline to the Patriot. It was clear to me that there was sufficient indirect evidence connecting the bloodline, but I needed strong proof statement to connect all the dots for the genealogical staff at the SAR. I conducted an internet search for lineage society proof statements, but the results did not yield a lot of helpful information.

I recently attended a Registrar/Genealogists training session with the SAR, and they indicated that proof arguments need to be concise, and to the point. Someone indicated the DAR imposed a strict page limit for proofs arguments. The SAR does not limit the number of pages for a proof argument, however they made it clear that they do not have the time and resources to read through lengthy proof arguments.

I spent a week going through all the evidence to address the concerns raised by the SAR genealogy staff. I submitted a new Proof Argument, with all the proof sources. The effort paid off, and the candidate’s application was approved!

Have you written a proof argument or proof statement for a lineage society? I would love to hear your feedback.

References

References
1 read my post about the strict policy on birth certificates: https://www.americankindred.com/wp/archives/529
Sep 142023
 

Fans of Yellowstone, the popular Paramount drama series, are familiar with the fictional character John Dutton.  The series presents John Dutton as a man whose family settled in Montana after the American Civil War.  John Dutton became the owner of one of  the largest cattle ranches in the United States, and served as Governor of Montana.  

This biography will introduce another John Dutton who was an American Patriot.  Unlike the man in the Paramount series, this John Dutton wasn’t well known or popular.  His name is not recorded in history books. He was an ordinary citizen who supported the cause of the American Revolution that led to the freedom that Americans enjoy today.       

John Dutton, the Patriot was born 23 January 1730 in Wallingford, Connecticut, the son of Benjamin Dutton and Mary Cone.  The Connecticut Dutton family were of Saxon lineage, and they assumed their surname from their place of residence, a township on the Weaver River in Cheshire, England.  The Dutton family were among the first settlers in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first of them arriving with the early puritans in 1630.

John Dutton’s father gave him 20 acres in Farmington on 11 January 1754.  He married Abigail Webster on 14 March 1754 in Farmington, Connecticut.  Abigail was the daughter of John Webster and Abiel Steele. Abigail’s family were also earlier settlers in the American Colonies.   Her paternal 2nd great-grandfather, John Webster, was an early settler of New England, and served as the Governor of the Colony of Connecticut in 1656.  Her maternal 2nd -great grandfather was Mayflower passenger, William Bradford, the 2nd Governor of the Plymouth Colony.

John and Abigail Dutton had eight children:

Osee (or Hosea) Dutton, born 29 December 1754 Farmington, CT

Luthena Dutton, born 31 July 1756 Farmington, CT

John Dutton, born 25 Aug 1758 Farmington, CT

Levi Dutton, born 14 Feb 1760 Farmington, CT

Susanna Dutton, born 08 August 1762, Southington, CT

Abigail Dutton, born 10 May 1764, Southington, CT

Rhoda Dutton, born 7 Jan 1767, Southington, CT

Prudence Dutton, born 15 Jan 1769, Southington, CT

On 16 September 1777, John Dutton showed his allegiance to the United States by taking the Oath of Fidelity to the state of Connecticut. Taking the Oath of Fidelity during the American Revolutionary War and during the early days of American Independence meant swearing allegiance to the state, and denying allegiance and obedience to Great Britain.

John Dutton died 27 August 1819 at the age of 89 years old.   He is buried in St. Peter’s Episcopal Cemetery in Oxford, CT, alongside his wife who died in 1824.

Sources:

Dutton Family, CT, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, April 1912

New Haven, CT: Families of Ancient New Haven

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 22, William Bradford.

Mullen, Connecticut Town Meeting Records during the American Revolution, Volume 1 

I am is a descendant of John Dutton, through his daughter Luthena.   My supplemental SAR application was approved in March of this year.

Mar 172023
 

Dear Davis,

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, and Happy Birthday to your mother.  When your mother was born today, the doctor joked around and said it was a wonder that she did not come out green!

As St. Patrick’s, Day rolls around each year, you will probably wonder, “Am I Irish”?  The answer is yes.  You absolutely have Irish blood!

Our Irish roots can be traced back to Ulster, one the traditional Irish province in Northern Ireland.  The province of Ulster became predominately settled by protestants from England and Scotland. Many of these Irish protestants came from Northern Ireland to the American colonies before the Revolutionary War.   They came to America for greater religious freedom, and the promise of land ownership.  American descendants of the Irish protestants who emigrated from Ulster in Northern Ireland to America during this time period are called Scots-Irish or Scotch-Irish.

My DNA results match my own family tree research, that I am Scots-Irish, mostly from my mother’s side (McWilliams and Hopper). My DNA ethnicity results show that I am 39% Scottish, and 20% Irish.

Drake’s DNA ethnicity estimates as of March 2023

Grammie B’s DNA test results also show that she is 34% Scottish, and 14% Irish, with the Irish coming from her father’s side.

Becky’s DNA ethnicity as of March 2023

Proudly wear green on St. Patrick’s day and celebrate your rich Irish heritage!

Love,

Pop-Pop

Feb 262023
 

Alexander Mcquain[1]He is also referred to as Alexander McQueen in some repositories, including the DAR database was born about 1755 in Edinburgh Scotland[2]Family researchers believe that the McQueen Family originated in Ireland. They came to Scotland around 1330 as part of the dowry of Margaret O’Cathan.. As a young man,  Alexander was afforded the opportunity to attend college, and graduated from the classical and theological department at the University of Edinburgh in early 1775.  

While attending college, Alexander’s parents hoped he would choose the church as a career.   However,  these were troubling times for Great Britain, and while studying at the University of Edinburgh, he became aware of all the freedoms enjoyed in the American colonies. Soon after he graduated from college, he packed all of his personal belongings into a wooden chest[3]his wooden chest has been preserved, and handed down to McQuain descendants, often the oldest child.. It has been stored in an attic, used to store blankets, as a hope chest, and as an end table.,  and set sail for the American colonies, arriving in Philadelphia in 1775.  Fate was on his side, as the  window of opportunity to immigrate from Scotland soon closed. The British government outlawed immigration from Scotland on September 21, 1775.  This ban lasted until the end of the Revolutionary War.

Military Service

Alexander joined the Virginia Militia,  and  served the American colonies as a private in Captain Peter Hull’s Company of the 2nd Battalion of the  Augusta Militia.

Alexander McQuian was part of Captain Peter Hull’s calvary that participated in the Siege of Yorktown, which led to  the surrender of Cornwallis.  After the surrender at Yorktown they divided up the spoils of war,  and  Alexander McQuain received much needed supplies – including food, ammunition, a blanket, and an overcoat.  He also received a mess pot, a sword, and an English musket as his share of the loot from the British,  which have all been passed down to his descendants.

On April 17, 1782,  Alexander McQuain received a land grant of 52 acres in what is now Pendleton County,  West Virginia.

Marriage and Family 

While serving in Captain Hull’s company,  Alexander McQuain forged a strong bond with fellow compatriot  Hugh Bodkin, who came to the American Colonies from Ireland and had been a professor at the University of Dublin. Alexander  married  Hugh’s daughter Mary Bodkin about 1782 and they settled in Pendleton County, Virginia.   They had ten children:  Duncan, John, William, Alexander, Hugh Alexander, Nancy Elizabeth, Thomas, Jane, Esther,  and Isabella[4] Alexander McQuain’s Descendants.

Descendants from Alexander Mcquain’s children Duncan, Jane, Thomas, Alexander, and John have submitted SAR and/or DAR applications.

Death and Burial

Alexander McQuain died after 1820 and is buried in an unmarked grave near Moyers, West Virginia. His oldest son, Duncan McQuain, is buried in the McQuain-Wees Cemetery[5]The Wees Family designated a parcel of land between the Wees and McQuain properties to be used jointly as a cemetery. in Pendleton County,  West Virginia.  A marker for Alexander McQuain was erected in this cemetery which reads as follows:

Alexander McQuain
c1756 – C1825
Virginia Militia

Revolutionary War Patriot
Serving in
Capt. Peter Hull’s Co

Buried 164 Miles
To the NW

Buried 164 miles
To the NW
38 30 7.74 N  79 25 31.21 W
In an unmarked grave
Alongside his wife


Mary Bodkin McQuain
C1766 – C1803

Sources

Clemmer Frances McQuain Lessley. 2003. Blood Of Our Blood : Families in History. New Market , Virginia: Frances McQuian Lessley.

McQuain David. 2020. Three Wolves a Detailed History of the American Mcquains and Their Gaelic Roots. iUniverse.

McQuain Thomas Bryan and Miriam McQuain Looker. 2008. Tell Me a Story Grandpa : West Virginia Stories About Farm Life One-Room Schools Logging Hunting Civil War. Westminster Md: Heritage Books.

Shawkey Morris Purdey. 1928. West Virginia: in History, Life Literature, and Industry. Chicago: Lewis Pub.

References

References
1 He is also referred to as Alexander McQueen in some repositories, including the DAR database
2 Family researchers believe that the McQueen Family originated in Ireland. They came to Scotland around 1330 as part of the dowry of Margaret O’Cathan.
3 his wooden chest has been preserved, and handed down to McQuain descendants, often the oldest child.. It has been stored in an attic, used to store blankets, as a hope chest, and as an end table.
4 Alexander McQuain’s Descendants
5 The Wees Family designated a parcel of land between the Wees and McQuain properties to be used jointly as a cemetery.
Feb 012023
 

DNA expert and genealogist Roberta Estes [1]https://dna-explained.com/about/ makes a great case that lineage societies should reexamine the policy of requiring birth certificates. She writes:

Birth certificates are the most personal document you will ever have. Birth certificates are utilized for passports and are the premier document, meaning the most highly prized, for identity theft. Once compromised, you can never obtain a different birth certificate. It’s not like a credit card that you can cancel and have reissued. [2]https://dna-explained.com/2019/10/04/lineage-societies-requirements-and-dna/

SAR Policy on birth certificates

The Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) began requiring applicants to provide birth certificates in 2017. In December of 2021 that policy was amended to require “applicants to present a birth certificate or court order specifying their sex as male.” [3]https://www.sar.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/211222a-Letter-No-4.pdf

I am the registrar of a local chapter of the SAR. Last year I was working with an approved member that wanted to submit an application on behalf of his 86 year old father, an Air Force veteran. Since the son’s application was based on his paternal lineage, I anticipated his application would sail through the approval process.

The application was rejected, pending more documentation. Specifically the application was rejected because when the son joined the society, he submitted a New York birth index documenting his father’s birth and parentage. The birth index did not state the sex for his father, who was born in 1935. Even though he was listed as the father on his son’s birth certificate, his application was marked “pending” until he provided a birth certificate indicating he was born as a male.

Unfortunately, he did not have a true copy of a birth certificate in his possession. He had a “registration of birth” from the state of New York, a document that been accepted as a birth certificate for his Social Security Account, his driver’s licenses (NY and KY) , his USA passport, and his enlistment into the United States Air Force during the Korean War.

Since this was the only birth document he had in his possession, and it did not indicate his sex, I appealed to the Genealogist General of the society for an exception to policy. The Genealogist General denied my request for an exception to policy. He wanted the applicant to attempt to obtain a New York Birth certificate .[4]This was problematic in itself. The son dealt with the New York State Department of Health in the past and he indicated that they were, objectively, slow, and, subjectively, difficult.  Since … Continue reading

The SAR is a male lineage society, and a person has to be a male to join the society. However, protecting our male lineage society  does not mean that we need to abandon logic and commonsense. It was clear to me what was going on here. I believe his application was pended only to set a precedent, to prevent “Sally” from joining our male lineage society.  This precedent that is being set abandons common sense, and comes at the expense of the hundreds of volunteers and future applicants. Furthermore, the policy is undermined by the fact that an individual can now have the sex on their birth certificate altered.

Ultimately, I was able to get this gentleman approved, but not without him requesting his birth certificate using the VitalChek® system. I agree with Roberta Estes, that the policy of requiring birth certificates needs to be reexamined.

References

References
1 https://dna-explained.com/about/
2 https://dna-explained.com/2019/10/04/lineage-societies-requirements-and-dna/
3 https://www.sar.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/211222a-Letter-No-4.pdf
4 This was problematic in itself. The son dealt with the New York State Department of Health in the past and he indicated that they were, objectively, slow, and, subjectively, difficult.  Since the New York State shutdown for COVID, they had been particularly non-responsive to contact via website, email, or telephone.  Their offices at the time had been closed for over two years to walk-in inquires with no advice on when they would re-open.  Historically, the office had been slow to respond – an outdated notice on their website at the time indicated an 8 month wait time for non-critical inquiries.
Jun 232022
 

Originally published in Louisville Genealogy Society Quarterly Newsletter, Lines-and-By-Lines (Volume XXXVII, No. 2, Summer 2022)

My home state of Illinois has a “Prairie Pioneer Certificates program”. This program started by The Illinois State Genealogical Society during the Bicentennial honors those who contributed to Illinois’s rich history. The first certificate was issued in 1982, and now over 3,000 certificates have been issued to descendants of Illinois Pioneers.

There are three categories of certificates. The first category is for descendants of pioneers that came to Illinois Pre-statehood (prior to 03 December 1818). These certificates have a Golf Seal with Ribbon. The second category for descendants of pioneers that arrived in Illinois between 04 December 1818 and 31 December 1850. These certificates are issued with a Gold Seal. The third category is for descendants of settlers that arrived in Illinois between 1 January 1851 and 31 December 1880. These certificates have an Embossed Seal.

Applicants are required to complete a Straight-Line lineage chart, with documentation proving the bloodline for each generation. There is a $20 application fee, and the certificates are mailed once the lineage is verified.

I submitted an application for my ancestor Josiah Andrews. He came to Jasper County , Illinois from Green County, Ohio in 1842. I just recently received my Gold Seal Prairie Pioneer certificate for my Illinois Prairie Pioneer, Josiah Andrews. Additionally my ancestor received shout-out on the Illinois State Genealogical Society Website.

For more information on the Prairie Pioneers certificate program, visit the Illinois State Genealogical Society website.

May 262022
 

Originally published in Louisville -Thurston Chapter newsletter The Long Rifleman (Volume 13, Issue 5, May 2022) [1]https://louthrustonsar.org/…/L.T._May_2022_Newsletter.pdf

James Devlin born 10 July 1750 in Ulster, Ireland [2]Most DAR and SAR applications (including my own application) show James Devlin as being born in South Carolina.  This biography cites township records that show he emigrated from Northern … Continue reading, immigrated to South Carolina in 1767 as a result of legislation passed by the South Carolina legislature to attract poor Protestants to their colony.

Colonial South Carolina realized early on that it needed to attract new settlers to keep the colony afloat.  In July of 1761, the South Carolina General Assembly passed the General Duty Act to entice Protestants from Europe to settle in the colony. [3]Phil Norfleet, “Incentives for Migration to South Carolina Before the Revolution”, South Carolina Loyalist and Rebels ,( http://sc_tories.tripod.com/migration_to_sc_before_the_revolution.htm : … Continue reading  This 1761 Act paid ship owners a bounty of four pounds sterling for every poor protestant that they brought to South Carolina from Europe.

As a result of this legislation, merchants recruited Protestants from Europe to collect the bounty.  Captain Samuel Hannah, and William Ray, one of the owners of an 80 ton merchant ship called the Nancy, traveled all over Northern Europe to find prospective passengers in order to collect the bounty. A ship the size of the Nancy could have comfortably carried 80 adult passengers. The owners misrepresented the size of the ship, and James Devlin was among 290 passengers crammed into the vessel for the nearly two month long voyage from Belfast, Ireland to Charleston, South Carolina.  When the Nancy arrived in port on 5 June 1767, many of the passengers were sick and dying. [4]Richard MacMaster, “They Came Through Charleston” ,  Ulster Roots August-September 2002 ( https://www.electricscotland.com/familytree/magazine/augsep2002/ulster_roots.htm : accessed 11 March … Continue reading

After James arrived in Charleston, James and the other healthy [5]The South Carolina Council Journals only record the names of 112 passengers that arrived on the Nancy. passengers traveled nearly 200 miles to the township of Boonesborough,[6]Boonesborough  was located in present-day Greenwood County; “Boonesborough Township, South Carolina”, Carolina – One unique vision! Two very different results !!,  (  … Continue reading so the merchants could claim their bounty.[7]J.A. Revill, Compilation of the original lists of the Protestant immigrants to South Carolina, 1763-1773. (Columbia, S.C.: The State company,1939 ); James had to produce a certificate showing that he was a member of a protestant congregation and had arrived on the encouragement of a bounty.  In return he was given 100 acres along Long Cane Creek.[8][1] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, “Foster, Samuel, Plat for 100 acres on Long Cane Creek”, Series S213184, Volume 15, Page 197, Item 3. (https://archivesindex.sc.gov : … Continue reading

After settling in Boonesborough James married Margaret Ann Gray.  Margaret was also an immigrant from Ireland.  She came to South Carolina aboard the Earl of Hillsborough a few months before James.

   Military Service

James had lived in the colony of South Carolina for nearly eight years when the battles of Lexington and Concord commenced on 19 April 1775.   Many Scotch-Irish in South Carolina who arrived shortly before the start of the Revolution remained loyal to the crown.[9]Peter N. Moore , “The Local Origins of Allegiance in Revolutionary South Carolina: The Waxhaws as a Case Study”, South Carolina Historical Magazine ,vol 107, no 1, (Jan 2006): 26–41   There was no question about James’ allegiance to colonial America.  Three months after the first shots were fired,   James dutifully enlisted as a private in the 3rd Regiment of the Continental Army.  He served in Captain Felix Warley’s company, which was commanded by Colonel William Moultrie.[10]Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, vol. 1 (Genealogical Publishing, 2006).

Under the command of Colonel William Moultrie, James Devlin fought at the battle of Sullivan’s Island.   It was during this battle that the enemy shot down the fort’s flag.  James witnessed Sergeant William Jasper heroically restore the flag under enemy fire. [11]Battle of Sullivan’s island (U.S. national park service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service), https://www.nps.gov/articles/battle-of-sullivan-s-island.htm ; Accessed 12 Mar. … Continue reading

After serving three years, James was discharged from the Continental Army on August 14, 1778 at Charleston, SC.    Three months later, in November of 1778, he joined the militia under the command of General Pickens.

Bounty Land Warrant and Pension

On 26 August 1818, James applied for a pension under the pension act which was passed by congress 18 March 1818.  He was awarded $8 a month for a sum of $96 per year.[12]The Pension Roll of 1835, Indexed edition, vol. 3: The Southern States (Clearfield, 1992).

James received a bounty land warrant of 200 acre for his service in the Revolutionary war.  However, the bounty that was given to him was for land that was previously granted. After a lengthy and costly legal process, the bounty was revoked.[13]South Carolina Archives,” Devlin, James, Account Audited (File No. 1900C) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution. Date: 1776 C. or later”,Series S108092 , Reel 33 Frame 588.

Death and Burial

James died 26 November 1825 at the age of 75 years old.   His estate was settled at the Abbeville Courthouse in January of 1826.    James Devlin, John Devlin, and Jannet Devlin (window of Charles Devlin) were named in the court proceedings.[14]Miscellaneous Estate Papers (Abbeville County, South Carolina), 1782-1958; Author: South Carolina. Probate Court (Abbeville County); Probate Place: Abbeville, South Carolina Descendants from all three of these have joined the SAR or DAR. 

James was buried in the church graveyard at Cedar Springs.   His son, Col James J. Devlin erected a headstone, which reads as follows:

Sacred to the memory of James Devlin, who died in 1825.  He was a patriot of the Revolution and fought under Col. Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island and the defeat of Peter Parker and saw Jasper replace the flag amidst the thunders of British guns.  He was among the first in the erection of Cedar Springs Church, where his dust now lies. [15]Find A Grave, database with images (http://www.findagrave.com: accessed 12 March 2022), memorial 43161230, James Devlin, (1750-1825), gravestone photographed by D.A.R., member 47391530.

References

References
1 https://louthrustonsar.org/…/L.T._May_2022_Newsletter.pdf
2 Most DAR and SAR applications (including my own application) show James Devlin as being born in South Carolina.  This biography cites township records that show he emigrated from Northern Ireland.
3 Phil Norfleet, “Incentives for Migration to South Carolina Before the Revolution”, South Carolina Loyalist and Rebels ,( http://sc_tories.tripod.com/migration_to_sc_before_the_revolution.htm : accessed 11 March 2022).
4 Richard MacMaster, “They Came Through Charleston” ,  Ulster Roots August-September 2002 ( https://www.electricscotland.com/familytree/magazine/augsep2002/ulster_roots.htm : accessed 11 March 2022).
5 The South Carolina Council Journals only record the names of 112 passengers that arrived on the Nancy.
6 Boonesborough  was located in present-day Greenwood County; “Boonesborough Township, South Carolina”, Carolina – One unique vision! Two very different results !!,  (  https://www.carolana.com/SC/Towns/Boonesborough_Township_SC.html  :accessed 11 March 2022.
7 J.A. Revill, Compilation of the original lists of the Protestant immigrants to South Carolina, 1763-1773. (Columbia, S.C.: The State company,1939 );
8 [1] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, “Foster, Samuel, Plat for 100 acres on Long Cane Creek”, Series S213184, Volume 15, Page 197, Item 3. (https://archivesindex.sc.gov : accessed 12 March 2022) ; Brent Holcomb, Petitions For Land From The South Carolina Journals, VolumeVI:1766-1770 (SCMAR, 1999), pages 86-93, 166-167
9 Peter N. Moore , “The Local Origins of Allegiance in Revolutionary South Carolina: The Waxhaws as a Case Study”, South Carolina Historical Magazine ,vol 107, no 1, (Jan 2006): 26–41
10 Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, vol. 1 (Genealogical Publishing, 2006).
11 Battle of Sullivan’s island (U.S. national park service).” NPS.gov Homepage (U.S. National Park Service), https://www.nps.gov/articles/battle-of-sullivan-s-island.htm ; Accessed 12 Mar. 2022.
12 The Pension Roll of 1835, Indexed edition, vol. 3: The Southern States (Clearfield, 1992).
13 South Carolina Archives,” Devlin, James, Account Audited (File No. 1900C) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution. Date: 1776 C. or later”,Series S108092 , Reel 33 Frame 588.
14 Miscellaneous Estate Papers (Abbeville County, South Carolina), 1782-1958; Author: South Carolina. Probate Court (Abbeville County); Probate Place: Abbeville, South Carolina
15 Find A Grave, database with images (http://www.findagrave.com: accessed 12 March 2022), memorial 43161230, James Devlin, (1750-1825), gravestone photographed by D.A.R., member 47391530.
Apr 112022
 

Originally published in Family Tree Magazine, December 2006.

My great-great Uncle Bennett Hopper left Jasper County, Illinois for California.  Grandmother said he got into a dispute with the family, and told them to just send a postcard if anyone died.  That is all I knew about the mysterious great Uncle Ben until recently.

 While researching the Hopper family online, I found my great-grandparents in the Champaign County (IL) Historical and Genealogical index, so I ordered a copy of the record.    I received it along with a note from librarian Rosemary Raeske.

She wrote, “Sometimes here in the archives we talk about the ‘spirits,'” and explained that the same day she handled my request, she also was researching a newspaper article about an Abraham Lincoln historical marker. She put a microfilm roll of the 1921 Urbana Courier on the film reader and started scrolling through that, but a small article caught her eye. She included it in my packet [1]That news story can be viewed here: https://americankindred.com/showmedia.php?mediaID=122&medialinkID=335. The article said Mrs. Addie Hopper sued Bennett Hopper for divorce, charging infidelity and desertion — her husband had run away with another woman. Mrs. Hopper alleged Bennett Hopper and the woman lived together in Stephenson County, IL for several years, then “left together for parts unknown.” That would certainly explain his dispute with the rest of the Hopper family.

-Drake

I was reminded of this story while reviewing the lineage of a prospective SAR member this past weekend. His 2nd great grandmother died and was buried in Kentucky. He showed that her husband died a few years earlier , and was buried in Texas — next to another woman. I thought he had the wrong spouse attached to his 2nd great grandmother. However, a link to a news story on Find a Grave​ explained everything. The husband deserted his family, and ran off to Texas with anther woman.

References

References
1 That news story can be viewed here: https://americankindred.com/showmedia.php?mediaID=122&medialinkID=335
Nov 172021
 

During the lockdown of the pandemic, I decided to complete my goal of documenting Revolutionary War Patriots for all four of my grandparents. While researching ,  I reviewed DNA matches on Ancestry.com for clues.  A   ThruLines match to Elkanah  Gustin born  in 1774 I caught my attention.   I looked him up on the DAR descendant’s database and found that he descended from American Revolutionary War patriots   George Morris and   John Corbley. 

I downloaded the DAR application to see if there were any sources that would help me in preparing an SAR supplemental application.    Imagine my excitement when I found a reference to the DAR manuscript:  Elkanah F. Gustin, descendant of Mayflower passenger Edward Fuller, compiled by Katherine Dearing.  I found a potential link back 400 years to the Mayflower, and I wasn’t even looking!

 I joined a Facebook group for tips on navigating the process of documenting an application for the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.   I soon learned that many of the Mayflower descendants were connected to more than one passenger.  I began researching more, and with the help of website https://www.relativefinder.org/ found a link to Governor William Bradford.  This really peaked my interest because this line shared the last seven generations of one of my recently approved SAR supplemental applications. 

I worked with   Evelyn Chase ZonderDek, Historian for the Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to help me prepare the application.  She found additional proof documents, and wrote a convincing proof analysis summarizing the genealogical evidence.  We submitted the application for William Bradford to Plymouth in March of 2021.  I waited patiently, and received notice from Evelyn that my application was approved on 12 November 2021!  I am officially a Mayflower Descendant!   Governor William Bradford is my 9th great grandfather.

 I also tried Relative Finder with Becky, and it shows she is a direct descendant of Mayflower passengers Francis Cooke, Richard Warren, and William Brewster.   These all go through her paternal grandmother Alberta (Goodman) Vertrees.   I have started gathering some of the proof documents for William Brewster.  If any Vertrees/Goodman kinfolk want to help, please let me know!

Nov 012021
 

During the summer of 2001, I was covered by Anthem health insurance, provided by my employer AdWare Systems, Inc.. At the time, Anthem was a mutual insurance company, meaning the company was owned by its members. This all changed , as the company went through a demutualization in November of 2001.

As part of the the demutualization process, I had to make a decision if I wanted stock or cash.

As compensation for the conversion, I was offered either cash or 25 shares of the newly formed WellPoint (NYSE:WLP).

How has this stock performed during the last twenty years?

WLP ended up having a starting price of about $42.00/share. However, if you look for WellPoint on the New York Stock Exchange today, you won’t find it. In December 2014, WellPoint changed their name back to Anthem, and the stock now trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol ANTM. Also worth noting is that in June of 2005, there was a 2:1 stock split. The adjusted starting point for someone receiving an initial 25 shares would be 50 shares at price of $21.61/share.

DateSharesPrice/ShareValue
Nov 1, 20015021.611080.50
Nov 1, 20065064.313215.50
Nov 1, 20115060.623031.00
Nov 1, 201650134.026701.00
Nov 1, 202150428.7621,438.00

 Posted by at 7:11 pm